It can be important for people in Missouri to plan for various aspects of their lives. People plan for their children’s education, for unexpected emergencies and expenses, retirement and other events that can arise. People should also plan for one’s death as well. It may not be something people like to think about, but people cannot bring anything with them when they pass away and it is important that they are able to control who receives their property.

If people do not have a valid will when they pass away, their property will be given to people according to the intestate laws. Under these laws who receives the property depends on which relatives of the deceased are alive at the time of the passing.

If the person has a spouse, the spouse will receive everything if they had no children. If the couple has children, the spouse will receive the first $25,000 and half of everything else. The children will receive the other half. If the person has children not with that spouse, then the spouse receives half of the property and the children receive the other half.

If the spouse does not survive the deceased, then the children will receive everything in equal shares. If there is no spouse or children, then the property goes to any surviving parents and siblings in equal shares. If the immediate family does not survive them, then the grandparents and uncles and aunts will split the property into equal shares.

When someone else is granted property

There are many reasons that people may not want their property to go to these individuals though. If that is the situation, then people may want to draft a will, which will allow them to dictate exactly who will receive their property.

Everyone in Missouri will pass away at some point in time. This is an unfortunate fact of life, but it is one people can plan for by drafting a will. There are certain requirements to ensure they are valid though. Experienced attorneys understand these requirements and may be able to assist people through the process.